The Myth of Vegan Deficiencies

It gets very exhausting having people tell you that you’re missing out on nutrients on a vegan diet. It couldn’t be farther from the truth. Being vegan is not about what we’re NOT eating, it’s about what we ARE eating.

It’s actually quite funny that I’m feeding my children whole grains, a huge variety of fruits and vegetables, tons of different beans, nuts, and SUPERfoods, while the people feeding their kids the average American diet of white flour and meat have the gall to call US malnourished.

Imagining that my children are malnourished for missing out on animal products is called being brainwashed by a wealthy multi-billion dollar meat industry. I’m sorry, but meat is not a MIRACLE food.

The only claim to nutrition for 3 oz of beef from the beef industry’s website is: Protein, iron, zinc, magnesium, vitamin E, and B vitamins. (Less than 20% of your daily value of any of those nutrients)

You can get every one of these nutrients from PLANT sources.

PROTEIN
According the the World Health Organization, the average 150 lb male requires only 22.5 grams of protein daily based on a 2,000 calorie diet.
Grams Per 1 Cup Serving
Black Beans 15
Black-eyed Peas 14
Garbanzos 15
Soybeans 29
Tofu 12
TVP 12
Whole Wheat 9
Boca Burger 13
Kashi Cereal 6
Artichoke 4
Green Peas 9
Oat Bran 7
Brown Rice 5
Almond 7

IRON
Please note this article, which explains why vegan sources of iron are actually more easily absorbed than iron taken with animal products.
Soybeans, cooked 1 cup 8.8
Blackstrap molasses 2 Tbsp 7.2
Lentils, cooked 1 cup 6.6
Spinach, cooked 1 cup 6.4
Quinoa, cooked 1 cup 6.3
Tofu 4 ounces 6.0
Bagel, enriched 3 ounces 5.2
Tempeh 1 cup 4.8
Lima beans, cooked 1 cup 4.4
Swiss chard, cooked 1 cup 4.0
Black beans, cooked 1 cup 3.6
Pinto beans, cooked 1 cup 3.5
Turnip greens, cooked 1 cup 3.2
Chickpeas, cooked 1 cup 3.2
Potato 1 large 3.2
Kidney beans, cooked 1 cup 3.0
Prune juice 8 ounces 3.0
Beet greens, cooked 1 cup 2.7
Tahini 2 Tbsp 2.7
Veggie hot dog 1 hot dog 2.7
Peas, cooked 1 cup 2.5
Black-eyed peas, cooked 1 cup 2.3
Cashews 1/4 cup 2.1

Checkout These Common Sources of Magnesium here.

Vitamin E per 100grams
Cereals ready-to-eat, KELLOGG, KELLOGG’S Complete Wheat Bran Flakes 11.93
Nuts, mixed nuts, dry roasted, with peanuts, with salt added 10.93
Nuts, pine nuts, dried 9.35
Snacks, potato chips, plain, unsalted 9.10
Peanuts, all types, dry-roasted, with salt 7.80
Tomato products, canned, paste, without salt added 4.30
Spinach, frozen, chopped or leaf, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt 3.54
Dandelion greens, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt 3.40
Turnip greens, frozen, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt 2.66

B Vitamins
Cooking destroys much of the B12 found naturally in animal foods. Plant-based foods, however, don’t have to be cooked and therefor keep their nutritional value.
B12- Found in fortified cereals, Nutritional Yeast, Fortified Non-Dairy Milks, and Mushrooms and many other found here.
B6- Found in Chic Peas, Brown Rice, Potatoes, Chestnuts, Buckwheat, and many others found here.

So while I’m feeding my children the FULL spectrum of vitamins, minerals and nutrients with a plant-based diet, the meat-eaters are being brainwashed into thinking they can get it ALL with a slab of meat and some type of white flour as a complete meal.

It’s completely ludicrous to think that such a variety of plant-based foods and super-foods could possibly be unhealthy, and I’m frankly tired of hearing about my so-called deficiencies. It only reveals how extremely uneducated the average American is when it comes to food.

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2 Responses to The Myth of Vegan Deficiencies

  1. Pingback: Common Questions about the Vegan Diet | Plants Only

  2. Pingback: What did God Really Say About Meat? | Plants Only

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